his is usually a problem of cloth elongation after shrinking. The cause may be insufficient moisture in the cloth being pre-shrunk or too much or too little moisture in the cloth coming from the palmer. Cotton fabrics usually require about 1% of moisture for each one ounce per square yard of cloth weight for stable cloth shrinkage. Too little moisture in the cloth being pre-shrunk does not permit the cloth to take on a stable new dimensional memory. Yarns may tend to pus out or elongate and the cloth will again shrink when washed.

Too much or too little moisture in pre-shrunk cloth coming from the palmer will also result in elongation of the cloth during relaxation. Ideally cloth coming from the palmer should have 4% residual moisture content. Less than 4% moisture content will usually result in relax elongation of the cloth, while more than 4% residual moisture content will result in less stable cloth which can be stretched with slight tension such as is normal during inspection and rolling of the cloth.